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What continents were the Lystrosaurus found on?

What continents were the Lystrosaurus found on?

Fossils of Lystrosaurus are only found in Antarctica, India and South Africa.

Where are Lystrosaurus fossils found?

Lystrosaurus fossils have been found in many Late Permian and Early Triassic terrestrial bone beds, most abundantly in Africa, and to a lesser extent in parts of what are now India, China, Mongolia, European Russia, and Antarctica (which was not over the South Pole at the time).

How might the location of Lystrosaurus fossils be seen as evidence that the continents were once together?

Lystrosaurus fossils be seen as evidence that the continents were once together? The Lystrosauros ae spread apart all of the ocean and so the continents would have had to been together in order for them to be spread all over. 2. Explore: Use the fossil evidence to help you make a new map of Pangaea.

Why Lystrosaurus fossils are found on these two continents?

Lystrosaurus was an herbivore that lived on land about 250 million years ago. Fossils of this Dinosaur have been discovered on the widely separated continents of Africa and South America. Predators transported the remains of this dinosaur between continents. Glaciers transport the fossils to the two continents.

Which is the best evidence that two continents were once connected?

Wegener then assembled an impressive amount of evidence to show that Earth’s continents were once connected in a single supercontinent. Wegener knew that fossil plants and animals such as mesosaurs, a freshwater reptile found only South America and Africa during the Permian period, could be found on many continents.

What killed the Lystrosaurus?

It’s likely that the planet cooled down for a time, then heated up into a devastatingly profound greenhouse. At the same time, all that carbon caused ocean acidification. The resulting climate changes ultimately killed off 95 percent of all species on Earth.

Where were Glossopteris fossils found?

The Glossopteris fossil is found in Australia, Antarctica, India, South Africa, and South America—all the southern continents. Now, the Glossopteris seed is known to be large and bulky and therefore could not have drifted or flown across the oceans to a separate continent.

Where was Glossopteris found?

Is the presence of animals fossil tells that South America Africa and Antarctica were once connected?

Many scientists thought that Africa, India, Australia, South America, and Antarctica had once been connected into a large ancient continent known as Gondwana. Those fossils belonged to a species previously found in Africa, providing further evidence that the distant present-day continents were once connected.

How did Lystrosaurus go extinct?

It’s likely that the planet cooled down for a time, then heated up into a devastatingly profound greenhouse. At the same time, all that carbon caused ocean acidification. The resulting climate changes ultimately killed off 95 percent of all species on Earth. But not Lystrosaurus.

Where are the Lystrosaurus fossils found in the world?

About Lystrosaurus. The most impressive thing about Lystrosaurus is how widespread it was. The remains of this Triassic reptile have been unearthed in India, South Africa and even Antarctica (these three continents were once merged together into the giant continent of Pangea), and its fossils are so numerous that they account for a whopping 95…

It was probably closely related to the African Lystrosaurus curvatus, which is regarded as one of the least specialized species and has been found in very Late Permian and very Early Triassic sediments. Distribution of four Permian and Triassic fossil groups used as biogeographic evidence for continental drift, and land bridging.

How did the Lystrosaurus get its name in the Bone Wars?

By the way, this unprepossessing reptile made a cameo appearance in the late 19th century Bone Wars: an amateur fossil-hunter described a skull to the American paleontologist Othniel C. Marsh, but when Marsh didn’t express any interest, the skull was forwarded instead to his arch-rival Edward Drinker Cope, who coined the name Lystrosaurus.

Where did the Lystrosaurus therapsid lizard live?

Lystrosaurus (meaning “shovel lizard” in Greek) is an extinct genus of dicynodont therapsid that lived during the Late Permian and Early Triassic periods, around 250 million years ago in what is now Antarctica, India and South Africa.