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What is the difference in how a volcanic arc island forms and how a hot spot forms a volcanic island?

What is the difference in how a volcanic arc island forms and how a hot spot forms a volcanic island?

An island arc forms at a converging plate boundary where one oceanic plate sinks beneath another oceanic plate. A hot spot volcano forms in continental or oceanic crust where magma from the mantle erupts. Hot spot volcanoes often are far from plate boundaries.

What is the difference between an island arc and a hot spot?

Hotspot Versus Island Arc Volcanoes At island arcs, the volcanoes are all about the same age. By contrast, at hotspots the volcanoes are youngest at one end of the chain and oldest at the other.

What a hot spot is and how a volcano forms there?

A hot spot is a region deep within the Earth’s mantle from which heat rises through the process of convection. This heat facilitates the melting of rock. The melted rock, known as magma, often pushes through cracks in the crust to form volcanoes. Instead it occurs at abnormally hot centers known as mantle plumes.

Which type of volcano is most closely associated with hot spots?

Most hotspot volcanoes are basaltic (e.g., Hawaii, Tahiti). As a result, they are less explosive than subduction zone volcanoes, in which water is trapped under the overriding plate. Where hotspots occur in continental regions, basaltic magma rises through the continental crust, which melts to form rhyolites.

Where does an island arc or a hot spot volcano form?

Which is an example of a volcanic arc?

A volcanic arc is a chain of volcanoes, hundreds to thousands of miles long, that forms above a subduction zone. An island volcanic arc forms in an ocean basin via ocean-ocean subduction. The Aleutian Islands off the coast of Alaska and the Lesser Antilles south of Puerto Rico are examples.

When do oceanic arcs form volcanic island arcs?

oceanic arcs form when oceanic crust subducts beneath other oceanic crust on an adjacent plate, creating a volcanic island arc. (Not all island arcs are volcanic island arcs.)

How are volcanoes formed above a subducting plate?

A chain of volcanoes formed above a subducting plate. Volcanic arc formation along a subducting plate. A volcanic arc is a chain of volcanoes formed above a subducting plate, positioned in an arc shape as seen from above. Offshore volcanoes form islands, resulting in a volcanic island arc.