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What type of plate boundary causes volcanoes to form?

What type of plate boundary causes volcanoes to form?

The two types of plate boundaries that are most likely to produce volcanic activity are divergent plate boundaries and convergent plate boundaries. At a divergent boundary, tectonic plates move apart from one another.

Where do more volcanoes form at convergent plate boundaries?

More videos on YouTube Volcanoes at convergent plate boundaries are found all along the Pacific Ocean basin, primarily at the edges of the Pacific, Cocos, and Nazca plates.

What is the three types of convergent boundaries?

Convergent boundaries , where two plates are moving toward each other, are of three types, depending on the type of crust present on either side of the boundary — oceanic or continental . The types are ocean-ocean, ocean-continent, and continent-continent.

How are volcanoes formed at convergent plate boundaries?

If two tectonic plates collide, they form a convergent plate boundary. Usually, one of the converging plates will move beneath the other, a process known as subduction. The new magma (molten rock) rises and may erupt violently to form volcanoes, often building arcs of islands along the convergent boundary. Click to see full answer

Why are the Cascades at a plate boundary?

The Cascades are a chain of volcanoes at a convergent boundary where an oceanic plate is subducting beneath a continental plate. Specifically the volcanoes are the result of subduction of the Juan de Fuca, Gorda, and Explorer Plates beneath North America.

What happens when two tectonic plates collide?

A convergent plate boundary is a location where two tectonic plates are moving toward each other, often causing one plate to slide below the other (in a process known as subduction). The collision of tectonic plates can result in earthquakes, volcanoes, the formation of mountains, and other geological events.

How are convergent boundaries formed in a collision?

Convergent boundaries are formed wherever two plates move toward each other. In the collision, the denser plate is typically subducted, meaning it slides below the other.