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What was the date of the Cockermouth flood?

What was the date of the Cockermouth flood?

November 19 2009
On the afternoon of November 19 2009 both the Rivers Derwent and Cocker swept through thousands of homes and businesses in the town centre of Cockermouth.

Why did Cockermouth flood in 2009?

The warm air from the mid-Atlantic caused relief rainfall over the Cumbrian Mountains. The warmer the air, the more moisture it holds. The falling rain poured into the River Derwent and River Cocker. Cockermouth is located at the rivers’ confluence and as a result, suffered significant flooding.

What caused the flooding in Cockermouth?

Physical causes The warm air from the mid-Atlantic caused relief rainfall over the Cumbrian Mountains. The warmer the air, the more moisture it holds. The falling rain poured into the River Derwent and River Cocker. The two rivers confluence at Cockermouth, which led to significant flooding.

What has been done to reduce flooding in Cockermouth?

Flooding in Cockermouth is reduced by over 500m of raised embankment and 1.2km of flood wall. These defences work together to manage river flows through the town. There is also 9 floodgates, 120m of self-raising flood barrier and numerous flap valves on drainage outfalls.

How did Cockermouth get its name?

Cockermouth /ˈkɒkərməθ/ is an ancient market town and civil parish in the Borough of Allerdale in Cumbria, England, so named because it is at the confluence of the River Cocker as it flows into the River Derwent.

Why is Cockermouth famous?

Cockermouth is famous for its association with various historical people – notably the poet William Wordsworth and the mutineer Fletcher Christian, both of whom were born in or near the town.

What percentage of businesses were flooded in the Cockermouth floods in 2009?

A survey by Cumbria Tourism found that 72% of tourist businesses across the county suffered some negative impact because of the floods and 6% of tourist business closed down completely. Now, nearly four years later, more than £4.4m has been spent on flood defence work in the town.

How long did the Cumbria floods last for?

The floods of 2009 and 2015 in north-west England were the worst for more than 550 years, according to groundbreaking analysis of lake sediment in the region.

What is the difference between a flood and a flash flood?

Flood: An overflow of water onto normally dry land. Flooding is a longer term event than flash flooding: it may last days or weeks. Flash flood: A flood caused by heavy or excessive rainfall in a short period of time, generally less than 6 hours.

How much did the Cumbria floods cost in damage?

Effects. Storm Desmond caused an estimated £500m of damage across Cumbria – almost double the cost of the floods that hit parts of the county six years ago.

When did the Cockermouth flood happen in 2009?

Following an extreme rainfall event on 19 November 2009, flooding was widespread throughout the county of Cumbria. In Cockermouth, a torrent of water some 2.5 m high cascaded down the main road, flooding and severely damaging shops, offices and homes.

How much has been spent on flood defences in Cockermouth?

Now, nearly four years later, more than £4.4m has been spent on flood defence work in the town. The Environment Agency has built walls, embankments and flood gates along the Cocker and Derwent rivers to help protect 360 vulnerable homes and 55 businesses prone to taking in water.

When did the River Cocker flood in Cumbria?

I’ve got chronic health problems. I can’t go through this again.” In November 2009, it was the river Cocker which caused an estimated £276.5m of damage in the west Cumbrian town after rising 2.5 metres (8.2ft) when 314mm of rain fell in one 24-hour period.

Is the Derwentside Gardens in Cockermouth still flooded?

Photograph: Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images Two days after the river Derwent breached flood defences the residents of Derwentside Gardens in Cockermouth were finally allowed back into their homes on Monday. The flood waters had receded, leaving a dirty layer of mud and silt across lovingly laid oak floors, carpets and rugs.